Tag Archives: Gamera

Blade Licking Thieves Podcast #8 – Gamera 3: The Revenge of Iris

gamera 3 poster

Download Link – Episode 8: Gamera 3 Revenge of Iris

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Random talk (00:00: 

Ultraman Orb, video game Engrish, wrestling, MacrossPower Rangers 

News (26:10):

Review (56:30)

We watch Gamera 3: The Revenge of Iris from 1999, the final film in the Heisei Gamera trilogy.

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Thanks for listening!

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Blade Licking Thieves Podcast #5 – Gamera 2: Attack of Legion

Gamera 2 Attack of Legion Poster

Download Link – Episode 5: Gamera 2 Attack of Legion

Drop us an Email.  Check out Grant on twitter.  Subscribe on iTunes.

Show Notes:

  • Brief Ultraman Orb impressions from Grant, which you can watch for free here: http://www.crunchyroll.com/ultraman-orb
  • Shout outs and blog talk.
  • Funimation’s Kickstarter for the Vision of Escaflowne Bluray with new English Dub comes out next month.  Here’s the trailer featuring the new dub cast.  Also, the super swag collector’s edition, which Zen has pre-ordered, is still available at Rightstuf.704400079702_anime-vision-escaflowne-tv-complete-series-movie-collection-altA
  • Super Dimensional Fortress Macross appears on Amazon Prime; Harmony Gold talk follows.
  • Our thoughts on Attack on Titan Season 2, Space Battleship Yamato 2202, and the new Godzilla anime announcements.
  • Finally, the 90s Gamera trilogy continues with our review of Gamera 2: Attack of Legion (starts at 36:31) from 1996.

Links:

If you have questions or comments about the show, please feel free to shoot us an Email or leave a comment below.

Thanks for listening!

Childrens’ Perspectives and Kaiju Mayhem

It is no secret that Kaiju movies are popular with children. Although many of the early works in the genre have a distinct horror/environmental tone, as these properties entered full-blown franchise mode many of the rubber-suited monsters became more kid-friendly.

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Always wear a helmet, kids!

There are some pretty obvious components to this. Many Kaiju films are marketed directly at children, so it is no great shock that they are roped into the genre. The scenes of destruction and conflict are exciting and easily understood by children, as opposed to deeper discussions of pollution, war, and human folly. Not to mention the general absurdity of enormous monsters battling is much more easily accepted by children’s less world-weary souls.

 

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Yeah, this stands up to scrutiny. – Billy, age 6

But I think there is another unexplored element to this – a child’s unique perspective.

By that I mean the literal viewpoint of a child in a physical sense. Most children who are somewhere between 5-10 years old are comparatively much shorter than adults. Often times when they encounter adults they must look up to see them quite literally towering overhead. This is especially intimidating when children meet a new adult, and we have all encountered a situation where a child reflexively hides behind a parent’s leg when first meeting a new person.

I think Kaiju tap into this primal fear of people/beings larger than ourselves. When Godzilla, Gigan, King Kong, or any number of other big beasts come stomping through a major metropolitan area in these films they are almost always filmed from a lower perspective or viewpoint. In a practical sense this is a camera trick to make the suit-wearing actors appear to be larger than normal people, but I think it also a psychological impact in that it mirrors the view of a child looking at a fully grown adult. Here we see destructive forces many times our height, laying waste to our world and we know we are powerless to stop them, much like a child would feel.

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In this way children are immediately drawn into the scene because they know what it is like to see the world from this perspective.

It also serves as a great power fantasy for younglings. Not only do they understand what it is like to look upwards at larger people or figures, but they get to see this size used to devastating effect as the monsters stomp, crush, and destroy all opposition. The excitement of watching a kaiju destroy smaller objects gives a sense of raw power that children rarely get to experience. As they project themselves onto these beasts, they see how they might use that power for fun in an imaginative space, unlike the real world where they are often told not to touch/break/mess with things. It is very similar to the construction of sand castles, which is almost inevitably followed by a child stomping through said castles and giggling all the while.

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Behold! I am Childaragon, destroyer of worlds!

This infuses Kaiju films with a sort of common language that I think few other films have, and is part of the reason why they still work even after 60 years of mighty monster mayhem.

Today’s question for the Rogues Gallery – do you think Kaiju movies resonate with children because of how they see the world? Or is there something else at work? Let us know in the comments below, rogues!

Blade Licking Thieves Podcast #2 – Gamera: Guardian of the Universe

Gamera Guardian of the Universe

Download Link – Episode 2: Gamera Guardian of the Universe – A Friend of At Least One Child (Maybe)

Drop us an Email.  Check out Grant on twitter.  Leave a comment below. Enjoy!

Show Notes:

  • Grant has a short Hulu followup.
  • The End of the Millennium, Retail-Apocalypse manga (aka DD Fist of the North Star) comes to a close.
  • We collectively ogle Woody Robo Sheriff Star.
  • We chatter on about Studio Ghibli Producer Nishimura’s controversial remarks (he has since apologized).
  • Finally, we discuss and review the 1995, Kaiju film, directed by Shusuke Kaneko, Gamera: Guardian of the Universe.  The review starts at 28:40.

Apologies again for the substandard audio quality.

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If you have questions or comments about the show, please feel free to shoot us an Email or leave a comment below.

Thanks for listening!